thepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.
A stunning CJR piece on freelancing in Syria. 
And along with that, a wonderful piece on contemporary war reporters and their work from the July issue of British GQ.
And Iraq veteran turned journalist Matt Cook has a beautiful article in Texas Monthly about returning to war as a journalist.
Syrian rebels say that Al Qaeda-affiliated militants assassinated Kamal Hamami, a top rebel commander, creating a further rift between rebels and militants and effectively opening a new front in the war. 
The Syrian conflict has contributed to a spike in the number of children globally who are being denied the ability to attend school because of war and conflict, now more than 50 million. More than 70% of last year’s 3600 incidents of attack on education occurred in Syria. [PDF of the UNESCO report]
Syrian activist and citizen journalist Fidaa al-Baali (aka Mohammed Moaz) succumbed to injuries sustained when government forces shelled his neighborhood.
The Ba’ath ruling party of Syria announced a leadership shake-up that included the ouster of Vice President Farouk al-Sharaa.
Two people were killed and six injured in an attack on a security checkpoint in North Sinai.
Clashes near the Republican Guard HQ in Cairo on Monday left 51 protesters dead and 435 injured. 
The awful death of an Egyptian teenager, Hamada Badr, thrown from a building by pro-Morsi protesters, has sparked more outrage in Egypt.
Egypt’s interim president appointed a prime minister and vice president. 
Jonathan Guyer writes in The New Yorker about politics and cartoons in Egypt.
Secular center-right Moroccan party Istiqlal has quit the coalition government over disputes regarding subsidies and economic policy.
Drone missions from a new base in Niger show the increased importance of Africa to the US plans for the war on terror.
Somali TV reporter Liban Abdullahi Farah, who worked for London-based Kalsan TV, was shot and killed in the northern capital of Galkayo. He is the fifth Somali journalist to be killed this year. 
A suicide bombing in Iraq yesterday evening killed 24 and wounded 49, bringing Thursday’s death toll, which included bombings in Ramadi and Fallujah, to 40.
Iran launched a mandatory national email service. 
Afghan-American interpreter Zakaria Kandahari, and has been wanted for the murder and torture of civilians while working with US Special Forces, was finally arrested.
The US built a $34 million command center in Helmand to support the troop surge that was unwanted and has gone unused. It will likely be demolished. 
Toxic trash being burned in an open-air pit at Camp Leatherneck is endangering the health of 13,500 Marines and civilians while $11.5 million incinerators that could safely dispose of waste go unused.
Al Jazeera reports on the ‘bin Laden files,” the results of Pakistan’s Abbottabad Commission to investigate the US’ unilateral action to kill bin Laden and how Pakistan could have missed that he had been hiding in plain sight on their soil.
Ehsanullah Ehsan, spokesman for the Pakistani Taliban, lost his job for “creating mistrust” between the Afghan and Pakistani branches of the group.
Russian prosecutors said that 215 NGOs were in violation of new law requiring them to register as foreign agents.
Mounting fears in Northern Ireland over sectarian violence prompt the police to call in reinforcements from Scotland, Wales and England.
Mexico is experiencing its worst election violence in years. 
The Colombian political party connected to FARC has regained legal status.
More secret files reported by The Guardian show the extent of Silicon Valley’s cooperation with the NSA: from Microsoft helping the NSA circumvent its encryption and access Skydrive to Skype handing over not just data but recordings of video calls.
Skinner v. Railway Labor Executives (1989): how a fairly obscure court case provided the “special needs” doctrine now used by the FISA court to justify surveillance.
Members of Congress point to what they say is a worrying pattern of officials lying to and misleading Congress about national security and surveillance.
The Electronic Privacy Information Center filed an emergency petition with the Supreme Court on Monday to stop the NSA’s surveillance program.
Some smart writing on surveillance by Human Rights Watch executive director Kenneth Roth at the New York Review of Books.
Daniel Ellsberg defends Snowden’s choice to leave the US, saying that when he leaked information the US was a much different place.
The Guardian aired the second part of their video interview with Snowden.
A Qunnipiac poll shows that the majority of Americans consider Snowden a whistleblower, not a traitor and show a “massive shift in attitudes” regarding whether or not US national security measures go too far in infringing on civil liberties.
Snowden has called a meeting in Sheremetyevo Airport with human rights groups like Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch, saying the US is unlawfully preventing him from seeking asylum.
Latin American countries are outraged by reports that the US has been spying on them with secret surveillance programs. 
These reports are also complicating annual talks with China.
Dzokhar Tsarnaev pleaded not guilty to 30 counts related to the marathon bombings. 
An X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System (a drone) successfully landed on an aircraft carrier off the coast of Virginia, the first time a drone has done so.
Reporters Without Borders condemns the prosecution of American journalist Barrett Brown, who faces 105 years in prison in connection with his work writing about leaked national security documents and hackers.
Nick Turse on getting the runaround from the military while trying cover war and national security.
Senators Feinstein and Durbin have urged the president to rein in force-feeding of Guantánamo inmates. 
While not a war read necessarily, it should be noted that Guantánamo inmates are not the only ones on hunger strike. 29,000 California inmates are on hunger strike in solidarity with those in solitary confinement.
New Obama pick to head the FBI is raising concerns over having condoned waterboarding and indefinite detention under Bush.
Rand Paul is threatening to hold up James Comey’s confirmation as head of the FBI until he gets further information on domestic drone use. 
The defense has rested in the case of Bradley Manning. 
The CIA let Khalid Sheikh Muhammad build a vacuum cleaner. 
If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign up through this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.
Photo: Sandy Row, Belfast, Northern Ireland. Loyalists watch a bonfire. Today, July 12th, marks the annual loyalist Orange Order parades which often spark sectarian clashes. Peter Morrison/AP.

thepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.

If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign up through this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.

Photo: Sandy Row, Belfast, Northern Ireland. Loyalists watch a bonfire. Today, July 12th, marks the annual loyalist Orange Order parades which often spark sectarian clashes. Peter Morrison/AP.

1,251 notes

thepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.
Egypt experienced a power turnaround for the second time in two years, as the army ousted the democratically-elected Morsi following days of popular protest. Chief Justice Adly Mansour was sworn in as interim leader only hours later. 
Syrian opposition fighters claim to be in control of most of the city of Dara’a.
Moises Saman photographs the “nowhere people,” Syrian refugees, in black and white. 
An ordinary day in Aleppo. A brief report from a day in the life of a photojournalist documenting the rebel fighters in Aleppo [in French].
Former Chad leader Hissene Habre has been charged with torture and crimes against humanity by a Senegalese court.
The UN began its military mission in Mali.
Iran’s president-elect has publicly promised to engage with the West.
Kate Clark writes that ISAF/The US did not simply fail to talk with the Taliban in 2002, but actively targeted them despite attempts to surrender and peaceably lay down arms.
A new study shows that drone strikes cause ten times the civilian casualties that strikes conducted by manned aircraft do. This contradicts the standardized claim that drone strikes are more precise and surgical as a tool of war.
In Afghanistan, Helmand province’s top female police officer was gunned down Thursday morning.
A truck bomb struck in Kabul for the fourth consecutive Tuesday, killing seven.
The Special Inspector General for Afghan Reconstruction has raised concerns over he three-quarter billion dollar purchase of helicopters for an Afghan aviation unit that lacks the manpower and expertise to use or maintain them.
UK forces have begun transferring detainees to Afghanistan.
A US drone strike killed 17 in northwest Pakistan.
On foreign journalists being kicked out of Pakistan.
Amnesty International claims that Russia and the Ukraine have been forcibly returning asylum-seekers to Central Asia in unlawful transfers. These people face risk of torture upon their return.
The Police Service of Northern Ireland will review the Historical Enquiries Team following the release of a report showing they were “less rigorous in [their] investigation of British state killings than of paramilitary killings.” 
Colombia’s FARC and the ELN (National Liberation Army) are in unification talks.
A plane carrying the Bolivian president home was turned around in European airspace based on suspicion that Snowden was on board. There is significant anger on the part of Bolivia and other Latin American countries.
A hidden bug was found in Ecuador’s London embassy (where Assange is staying), and an angry Ecuador is threatening to reveal who planted it.
The US government rested its case in the trial of Bradley Manning. The defense will begin Monday, aiming to have some of his charges dismissed. 
The USPS is subjected to the same metadata mining as telecommunications, with the exteriors of all mail being photographed and stored for an unknown period of time. 
The Washington Post decodes some PowerPoint slides on PRISM.
Reports that the US is bugging European allies have been met with anger. Angela Merkel calls it “extremely serious,” European firms will probably quit American Internet service providers, and upcoming trade negotiations have been complicated. Germany and the US will begin talks to alleviate the damage.
France has run its own NSA-style spying program on its citizens.
Restore the Fourth protesters were out yesterday to commemorate Independence Day by protesting NSA surveillance.
Snowden released a statement through WikiLeaks.
Here are the statuses of the 21 applications for asylum filed by Snowden. (20 really, because he withdrew his application to Russia because of their demands.)
Snowden’s job title/description explains his level of access and also some of the workings of the NSA.
Lots of lies and misinformation coming out of the federal government regarding NSA surveillance.
ProPublica has a handy FAQ on the NSA spying.
A FISA court has released the court records of Yahoo!’s failed, secret 2008 attempt to block data demands by challenging the Protect America Act, a FISA amendment.
Encryption has begun foiling US wiretaps.
More smart stuff on the journalists vs. advocates/activists debate from David Carr with an interview with Glenn Greenwald.
The State Dept’s Historical Advisory Committee has expressed concern over the declassification backlog and the delays in putting documents on historical record. 
Lawyers for four detainees at Guantánamo have asked a federal court to put a stop to force-feedings. Meanwhile, it has been announced that hunger striking inmates will only be force-fed at night during Ramadan. That’s 106 out of the 166 detainees.
A report on the suicide last year of a Yemeni detainee in Guantánamo has been made public.
If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign up through this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.
Photo: A’ali village, Bahrain. Demonstrators take part in an anti-government rally last Thursday. Ahmed Al-Fardan/Nur Photo/Zuma Press.

thepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.

If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign up through this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.

Photo: A’ali village, Bahrain. Demonstrators take part in an anti-government rally last Thursday. Ahmed Al-Fardan/Nur Photo/Zuma Press.

342 notes

thepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.
Journalism, particularly conflict and national security journalism, lost an important and talented voice this week: Michael Hastings, who is most known for his Rolling Stone article on Gen. McChrystal. Tributes to him include ones by Buzzfeed’s Ben Smith, and Rachel Maddow. Here are his tips for young journalists.
Bashar Al-Assad faces a currency crisis.
UNESCO added six ancient Syrian sites to the list of endangered World Heritage sites. 
Opposition fighters have been supplied by Saudi Arabia with Russian-made anti-tank missiles.
The G-8 endorsed an end to the war in Syria but remain divided on Al-Assad.
Rebels in northern Mali signed a peace deal.
An attack by Al-Shabab on a UN office in Mogadishu left 15 dead.
Britain’s Supreme Court invalidated sanctions on a commercial Iranian bank.
Celebrations both in Iran and abroad at the election of moderate Hassan Rouhani to the presidency, seen as a hope for improving the relationship with the West.
The Taliban have offered to release a US soldier held captive since 2009 in exchange for five of their senior operatives currently held in Guantánamo Bay.
In the push to wind down the war in Afghanistan, the US has scrapped more than 170 million pounds of military equipment and vehicles.
Kyrgyzstan voted to end the US lease on a critical airbase for supplying the war in Afghanistan in 2014.
Qian Guoliang is the third Chinese official in three months to have died in detention. An image of the body has raised serious questions about stated cause of death.
The US downgraded Russia and China in a report on human trafficking, causing some anger. 
Delyan Peevski was named head of Bulgarian security in the country’s three-week old government, triggering protests in Sofia beginning last Friday. He has now been removed from the post.
The case for more reporting on secrecy and transparency.
The FBI admitted at a Senate Judiciary hearing to surveilling the US using drones.
Gail Collins explains why when large databases and ineffective or abusive investigation are paired, that even the non-terrorists ought to worry.
Google challenges the US gag order regarding data requests that force the company to hand over information to the government.
Prosecutors in the 9/11 war crimes trial are trying to convince the judge to hold secret pretrial hearings that would exclude even the defendants.
Britain’s Supreme Court ruled that families of soldiers killed or injured in Iraq are legally allowed to sue the government for having failed to protect them.
An interactive map on drug seizures near the US-Mexico border from the Center for Investigative Reporting.
Women will be permitted to serve in the military’s most elite units, like the Navy SEALs, Army Rangers, and Marine infantry.
If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign up through this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.
Photo: Sao Paulo, Brazil. A protester runs from fires. Agencia Estado/Xinhua Press/Corbis

thepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.

Journalism, particularly conflict and national security journalism, lost an important and talented voice this week: Michael Hastings, who is most known for his Rolling Stone article on Gen. McChrystal. Tributes to him include ones by Buzzfeed’s Ben Smith, and Rachel Maddow. Here are his tips for young journalists.

If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign up through this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.

Photo: Sao Paulo, Brazil. A protester runs from fires. Agencia Estado/Xinhua Press/Corbis

496 notes

The Terror Diaspora #GWOT #endlesswarsView Post

The Terror Diaspora #GWOT #endlesswars

View Post

2 notes

Tom Dispatch: The Making of a Global Security State #surveillancestate #policestate #edwardsnowdenView Post

Tom Dispatch: The Making of a Global Security State #surveillancestate #policestate #edwardsnowden

View Post

1 note

Guerrilla Blog Dispatches – June 14, 2013 #militaryindustrialcomplex #policestate #surveillancestateView Post

Guerrilla Blog Dispatches – June 14, 2013 #militaryindustrialcomplex #policestate #surveillancestate

View Post

2 notes

Many U.S. military and intelligence officials attend Def Con and have been doing so for years. As early as the 1990s, the U.S. government was openly discussing cyber-war. Reportedly, in 2003, during the second Gulf War, the Pentagon proposed freezing Saddam Hussein’s bank accounts, but the Treasury secretary, John W. Snow, vetoed the cyber-strike, arguing that it would set a dangerous precedent that could result in similar attacks on the U.S. and de-stabilize the world economy. (To this day, the Treasury Department participates in decisions concerning offensive cyber-warfare operations that could have an impact on U.S. financial institutions or the broader economy.) After 9/11, when counterterrorism efforts and intelligence became increasingly reliant on cyber-operations, the pressure to militarize those capabilities, and to keep them secret, increased. As Iran seemed to move closer to building a nuclear weapon, the pressure increased even more.
As Wes Brown recalls, none of the government types in the audience said a word to him after his Mosquito presentation at Def Con. “None that I could identify as government types, at least,” he adds, with a chuckle. But about two years later, probably in 2007, malware now known as Flame appeared in Europe and eventually spread to thousands of machines in the Middle East, mostly in Iran. Like Mosquito, Flame included modules that could, through an encrypted connection to a command-and-control server, be updated, switched out, and re-programmed remotely—just like in-flight drone repair. The Flame software offered a very full bag of tricks. One module secretly turned on the victim’s microphone and recorded everything it could hear. Another collected architectural plans and design schematics, looking for the inner workings of industrial installations. Still other Flame modules took screenshots of victims’ computers; logged keyboard activity, including passwords; recorded Skype conversations; and forced infected computers to connect via Bluetooth to any nearby Bluetooth-enabled devices, such as cell phones, and then vacuumed up their data as well.
Read more of Michael Joseph Gross the Silent War. 

Many U.S. military and intelligence officials attend Def Con and have been doing so for years. As early as the 1990s, the U.S. government was openly discussing cyber-war. Reportedly, in 2003, during the second Gulf War, the Pentagon proposed freezing Saddam Hussein’s bank accounts, but the Treasury secretary, John W. Snow, vetoed the cyber-strike, arguing that it would set a dangerous precedent that could result in similar attacks on the U.S. and de-stabilize the world economy. (To this day, the Treasury Department participates in decisions concerning offensive cyber-warfare operations that could have an impact on U.S. financial institutions or the broader economy.) After 9/11, when counterterrorism efforts and intelligence became increasingly reliant on cyber-operations, the pressure to militarize those capabilities, and to keep them secret, increased. As Iran seemed to move closer to building a nuclear weapon, the pressure increased even more.

As Wes Brown recalls, none of the government types in the audience said a word to him after his Mosquito presentation at Def Con. “None that I could identify as government types, at least,” he adds, with a chuckle. But about two years later, probably in 2007, malware now known as Flame appeared in Europe and eventually spread to thousands of machines in the Middle East, mostly in Iran. Like Mosquito, Flame included modules that could, through an encrypted connection to a command-and-control server, be updated, switched out, and re-programmed remotely—just like in-flight drone repair. The Flame software offered a very full bag of tricks. One module secretly turned on the victim’s microphone and recorded everything it could hear. Another collected architectural plans and design schematics, looking for the inner workings of industrial installations. Still other Flame modules took screenshots of victims’ computers; logged keyboard activity, including passwords; recorded Skype conversations; and forced infected computers to connect via Bluetooth to any nearby Bluetooth-enabled devices, such as cell phones, and then vacuumed up their data as well.

Read more of Michael Joseph Gross the Silent War. 

7 notes

This is the undisputed domain of General Keith Alexander, a man few even in Washington would likely recognize. Never before has anyone in America’s intelligence sphere come close to his degree of power, the number of people under his command, the expanse of his rule, the length of his reign, or the depth of his secrecy. A four-star Army general, his authority extends across three domains: He is director of the world’s largest intelligence service, the National Security Agency; chief of the Central Security Service; and commander of the US Cyber Command. As such, he has his own secret military, presiding over the Navy’s 10th Fleet, the 24th Air Force, and the Second Army.
Alexander runs the nation’s cyberwar efforts, an empire he has built over the past eight years by insisting that the US’s inherent vulnerability to digital attacks requires him to amass more and more authority over the data zipping around the globe. In his telling, the threat is so mind-bogglingly huge that the nation has little option but to eventually put the entire civilian Internet under his protection, requiring tweets and emails to pass through his filters, and putting the kill switch under the government’s forefinger. “What we see is an increasing level of activity on the networks,” he said at a recent security conference in Canada. “I am concerned that this is going to break a threshold where the private sector can no longer handle it and the government is going to have to step in.”
Read more of James Bamford’s reporting about the Secret War.

This is the undisputed domain of General Keith Alexander, a man few even in Washington would likely recognize. Never before has anyone in America’s intelligence sphere come close to his degree of power, the number of people under his command, the expanse of his rule, the length of his reign, or the depth of his secrecy. A four-star Army general, his authority extends across three domains: He is director of the world’s largest intelligence service, the National Security Agency; chief of the Central Security Service; and commander of the US Cyber Command. As such, he has his own secret military, presiding over the Navy’s 10th Fleet, the 24th Air Force, and the Second Army.

Alexander runs the nation’s cyberwar efforts, an empire he has built over the past eight years by insisting that the US’s inherent vulnerability to digital attacks requires him to amass more and more authority over the data zipping around the globe. In his telling, the threat is so mind-bogglingly huge that the nation has little option but to eventually put the entire civilian Internet under his protection, requiring tweets and emails to pass through his filters, and putting the kill switch under the government’s forefinger. “What we see is an increasing level of activity on the networks,” he said at a recent security conference in Canada. “I am concerned that this is going to break a threshold where the private sector can no longer handle it and the government is going to have to step in.”

Read more of James Bamford’s reporting about the Secret War.

9 notes

thepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.
The death toll for the Syrian conflict is 93,000, according to the UN. 5000 people die every month.
The US announced confirmation of Syria’s use of chemical weapons and the ensuing debate about what the crossing of this so-called red line now means for US action.
Special UN rapporteur Richard Falk has called for an international inquiry into Israeli treatment of Palestinian prisoners.
A negotiated end is sought to protests and clashes in Turkey.
Tunisian rapper Weld El 15, on the run from a two year sentence for his anti-police song, has turned himself in.
The AFP tracks casualties in Iraq (Google Doc).
The polls have opened in the Iranian presidential election.
A pre-election hacking campaign targeted Iranian Gmail users.
President Hamid Karzai demanded on Saturday that Britain turn over more than 80 prisoners of war within two weeks.
In Kabul, a mid-week suicide bombing in front of the Supreme Court left sixteen or more civilians dead and many injured.
Bagram was handed over to Afghanistan three months ago, but dozens of foreign inmates, mostly Pakistani, have seen little change in their detention.
The US disrupted Al Qaeda’s online magazine Inspire.
Du Bin, a Chinese journalist who had completed a documentary on forced labor camps and freelanced for the New York Times, has been detained in Beijing. 
Korean officials held talks in Panmunjom.
Threats to journalists by paramilitary groups in Northern Ireland are on the rise.
Northern Ireland’s police have seized arms ahead of the G8.
Colombia’s peace talks have resumed in Cuba.
Brazilian journalist and newspaper José Roberto Ornelas de Lemos was murdered at a bakery in Rio de Janeiro on June 11.
A group of American physicians have called, in the New England Journal of Medicine, on Guantánamo Bay’s doctors to refuse participation in the force-feeding program.
An Iraqi prisoner named Abd al-Hadi and identified as a senior Al Al Qaeda commander has been charged in the Guantánamo war crimes tribunal.
Microsoft and Google both call on the government to allow them to be more transparent and forthcoming to the public about the government’s information/data requests to them.
Senator Gillibrand’s amendment that would remove military sex assault prosecutions from chain of command and hand them to independent military prosecutors  was stripped from the defense bill after backlash from top brass. Gillibrand, however, plans to push the measure on the floor.
The NSA leaker was identified upon his request as Edward Snowden, who has fled to Hong Kong.
Will China hand him over?
Concerned about what it might mean that the government knows your metadata? The Guardian has an interactive breakdown of what information is available from the telecom services we all use.
ProPublica also has some tips about safer online activity.
The Electronic Frontier Foundation recently met with surprise success against the Justice Department in FISA court. The EFF is after court documents on government surveillance activity that was found by a FISA court to have circumvented the law, which the FISA court has ruled is legal for them to obtain, (kind of shockingly) rejecting the arguments of the DOJ. Here’s a link to the ruling.
The ACLU hopes to see court success of its own in its lawsuit against the government over the Verizon metadata dragnet. As a Verizon customer itself, it can claim standing to sue. (The complaint itself.)
Inside the NSA’s China hacking group.
If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign up through this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.
Photo: Taksim Square, Turkey. A protester throws a petrol bomb towards the police. June 10. Kostas Tsironas/AP.

thepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.

If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign up through this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.

Photo: Taksim Square, Turkey. A protester throws a petrol bomb towards the police. June 10. Kostas Tsironas/AP.

362 notes

Whatever your take on recent revelations about government spying on our phone calls and Internet activity, there’s no denying that Big Brother is bigger and less brotherly than we thought. What’s the resulting cost to our privacy — and more so, our democracy? Lawrence Lessig joins Bill to discuss the implications of our government’s actions.